©
Search

A review of 1984 by Samarth Soni




The world of dystopia George created, and ended, was something I never thought existed around me. He showed me how everything that was going on in the book, is going on around me.


A review of 1984 by Samarth Soni


Winston Smith lives in a Oceania, one of the three super-states created after the global war. He's furiously entangled between the works of the ruling party, and mentally opposes the way in which it imposes dictatorship on the common people. As the story pans out, the situation doesn't seem to improve, but his life takes a number of turns. He suspects someone who he thinks thinks (thinking face with a ?) similar to him, and goes in search for that person. On the way he finds Julia, who becomes his love affair (that ahaannn face). The book challenges the norms of the present day governments and lets you in on how the political world runs. The fact that it's published in 1949, and it's a story about 1984, and it's valid even today, makes you expect so much from the book, and it delivers.



Ahead lie the spoilers, so look away, and leave a like, comments and if you'd love more of my bantering of books, share and save this one.


The person who Winston thinks thinks alike is O'Brien. He sees him reacting in a similar manner when the hate speech comes up on the telescreen, a television of sorts, known to record voices and happenings and deliver it to the ruling party of BIG BROTHER.



Every fear of the mind comes to life


Through the telescreen orders can also be delivered to you. Through it, the party can keep a check on your activities, they can see what you do or say, and they will catch you if they find out anything you say is against the party. There is a concept of thoughtcrime. It means that if you even think against the party, you're basically committing a crime and the thought police for that, which will arrest you, if they find this out (fascinating, isn't it?)








The twist in the tale


Back to O'Brien, he then contacts Winston, because Winston wanted to meet him and ask his help in taking the party down. Unfortunately, O'Brien turns out to be a member of the party, a very significant one, and Winston and Julia are caught red handed, together in bed, in a small room which was supposed to be a hideout. The party has some rules, one of which is the abolition of sexual intimacy and sexual desires and feelings(brutal). Both Winston and Julia are tortured to death, although not physical death.



Weren't killed, but scarred for life


They meet again, but neither does Winston have a mind which can think ill of Big Brother(he now actually loves him, as has been planted in his brain) nor does Julia look as beautiful as she did. The book ends on a sad note, reminding me how the political parties of today's world are capable enough of completely manipulating us to their will, and remove us from existence if they fail at it.




See some resemblance? Read the book, you'll get more.

 
 
 
©
©
©